• Working Moms Take Over as Family Bread Winners






    In 1960, at the beginning of the modern women’s liberation movement, women were certainly not new to the workforce, but just 11% of working moms were the primary supporters of their families. Today, working mothers are the primary breadwinners in 40% of U.S. households with children. It’s a paradigm shift that many American women hope will finally smash the glass ceiling once and for all and create true financial equality in the workplace. The new statistics arose from the latest Pew Research Center study on the influence of breadwinner moms on the economy and the implications for American families. While the

    Read more

  • What’s the Best Way to Get America Working Again?






    With unemployment continuing to hover around 7%, there’s lots of talk about the need to create more jobs. From the White House to industry board rooms to local coffee shops, people are in agreement about the need to create more jobs and get more U.S. workers back to work. But discussions bog down when they get to how to make it happen. From government economists to the unhappy unemployed worker heading for yet another job fair, there are plenty of ideas about how to jump start job creation but little agreement on who is best suited to lead the charge and

    Read more

  • Gen X & Y Falling Farther Behind as Economic Crisis Lengthens






    As the economic crisis lengthens, The young adults in Generations X and Y are falling farther and farther behind the wealth curve. Now approaching their 30s and mid-40s, Gen Y Millennials and Gen X Slackers, respectively, are in danger of becoming the first generations that may fail to become richer than their parents, despite a lifetime of hard work. The lingering economic crisis, lack of job opportunity, loss of housing value, and onerous weight of unpaid college and credit card debt seem to have wrested the American dream from their hands, denying them the opportunities for wealth building that traditionally occur

    Read more

  • Middle Class Jobs Growing Slower than Economy






    Before the recession a growing economy meant more jobs for the middle class; but that hasn’t proven true in post-recession America. Economic experts tell us that the economy is growing, albeit slowly; but the workers on Main Street are having a hard time seeing any progress. In today’s new world order, economic growth is not being translated into jobs for unemployed middle-class American workers as it did in previous generations. Nor is it putting more money in the pockets of those who are employed. As Washington Post reporter Jim Tankersley recently pointed out, “There are two kinds of middle-class Americans struggling today.

    Read more

  • Women Are Bearing Brunt of Lingering Unemployment






    When the recession hit, initially more men than women were forced into the unemployment lines. As the housing market crashed and it looked like Detroit might go belly up, pink slips went out to thousands of workers in the predominantly male bastions of construction and auto manufacturing. It took awhile for the recession to filter through the economy and affect service sector and administrative jobs which traditionally employ a preponderance of women. In the interim, the burden of family financial support necessarily shifted from men to women with many women becoming the sole breadwinners for their families – at least

    Read more

  • Economy Is Picking Up; Position Yourself for Employment






    Good news for unemployed and under-employed workers comes from two fronts: Layoffs are dropping which could indicate a coming increase in hiring. According to an Associated Press report, first-time applications for unemployment benefits dropped 5,000 nationwide in mid-January to a seasonally-adjusted 330,000, the fewest layoffs reported since January 2008. Because unemployment typically increases during the second week in January due to seasonal post-holiday layoffs, employment experts view the down-trending statistics as hopeful. While uncertainty over the federal budget could still keep worried employers from hiring, the layoff slowdown should give unemployed workers hope. The U.S. economy will pick up this

    Read more

  • No Change in Employment Picture for 2013






    We may be starting a New Year, but the U.S. employment picture seems stuck in the past. U.S. employers did add 155,000 jobs in December, according to the Employment Situation Summary just released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; but it wasn’t enough to change the unemployment rate which remains at 7.8%. Even worse, the report shows that average monthly job creation has remained stagnant over the past two years, averaging 153,000 jobs per month through 2011 and 2012. Despite what most economic experts consider to be a slowly improving economy, the job picture is unlikely to change much

    Read more

  • Employment Projections: Where Will the Jobs Be?






    If you’re thinking about embarking on a new career path or considering starting a business on Zoondy, it helps to know where the jobs are going to be. America has been undergoing a major upheaval over the past couple of decades as we have moved from a manufacturing economy to a service economy. The 2010-20 employment predictions prepared by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics clearly tell the story. The industries expected to suffer the greatest wage and employment declines over the next decade are primarily in manufacturing and government jobs. However, social, economic and technological changes are also making some jobs

    Read more

  • Economic Forecast: Tough Times Expected to Continue






    If you’ve started to loosen your seatbelt, lulled by decreasing unemployment into thinking the worst of over and America is finally shrugging its way out of the recession, you’d better buckle up tight. There is still plenty of rough riding ahead. In its most recent report, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office predicts that GDP (Gross Domestic Product) will grow at an average of only 2.4% per year through 2022. Economists agree that annual growth of less than 3% severely limits long-term national wealth and well-being. But 3% economic growth only gets us back on track. To expand and build wealth,

    Read more

  • Goodbye Golden Parachute; Hello Zoondy!






    Over the past couple of generations, employment expectations in America have undergone some drastic changes. As recently as the 1970s, it wasn’t unusual to know people who had worked at the same company their entire working lives. During your grandfather’s or great-grandfather’s time (depending on whether you’re a Boomer or Millennial), the 30-year career culminating in retirement and a gold watch was the norm. People could count on being employed by the same firm from their 20s until their retirement at 65, with a reasonable expectation that they could work their way up the ladder as their career progressed. U.S.

    Read more